GMAT

The Graduate Management Admission Test® (GMAT®) is a standardized assessment that helps business schools assess the qualifications of applicants for advanced study in business and management. Schools use the test as one predictor of academic performance in an MBA program or in other graduate management programs. GMAT is accepted by countries like USA, Canada, Singapore etc.

The GMAT exam measures basic verbal, mathematical, and analytical writing skills that you have developed over a long period of time in your education and work. It does NOT measure your knowledge of business, your job skills, specific content in your undergraduate or first university course work, your abilities in any other specific subject area, or subjective qualities—such as motivation, creativity, and interpersonal skills.

The GMAT® exam consists of three main parts

  •  Analytical Writing Assessment

    After a second optional ten-minute break, you begin the Verbal Section of the GMAT® exam. This section contains 41 multiple choice questions of three question types—Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and Sentence Correction. You are allowed a maximum of 75 minutes to complete the entire section.

  •  Quantitative Section

    Following an optional ten-minute break, you begin the Quantitative Section of the GMAT® exam. This section contains 37 multiple-choice questions of two question types—Data Sufficiency and Problem Solving. You will be allowed a maximum of 75 minutes to complete the entire section.

  •  Verbal Section

    After a second optional ten-minute break, you begin the Verbal Section of the GMAT® exam. This section contains 41 multiple choice questions of three question types—Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and Sentence Correction. You are allowed a maximum of 75 minutes to complete the entire section.

The GMAT® exam begins with the Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA). The AWA consists of two separate writing tasks—Analysis of an Issue and Analysis of an Argument. You are allowed 30 minutes to complete each one.

Following an optional ten-minute break, you begin the Quantitative Section of the GMAT® exam. This section contains 37 multiple-choice questions of two question types—Data Sufficiency and Problem Solving. You will be allowed a maximum of 75 minutes to complete the entire section.

After a second optional ten-minute break, you begin the Verbal Section of the GMAT® exam. This section contains 41 multiple choice questions of three question types—Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and Sentence Correction. You are allowed a maximum of 75 minutes to complete the entire section.


The purpose of the GMAT is to measure one’s ability to think systematically and to employ the verbal and mathematical skills that one has acquired throughout his/her years of schooling. The test does not aim to measure the knowledge of specific business or academic subjects. One is assumed to know basic algebra (but not calculus), geometry and arithmetic, to know the basic conventions of standard written English, and to be able to write an analytical essay.

Further details on the test can be found on www.mba.com and you can register for the test on this site.

OUR PROCESS OF GMAT

The starting point in the process is to understand where you stand and understand the test you are preparing for. This will also help to set your goal

Next starts a structured and well planned preparation. Our classes are timed and home practice is also timed. This helps you see how you can use the strategies taught in class to solve fast and accurately. As this is a test of speed and accuracy.

Most important phase is Testing and Analysis. Write lots of mock test and analyse your mistakes. We make you to detailed analysis of each test and lots of doubt solving sessions to slowly and steadily improve to your highest score

The right frame of mind is crucial on test day. We help you with that as well to achieve the state of mind conducive to success and doing your best in the test.